MOOSE

This past Monday we headed to work like I have been for the last 8 years and Stacey, 18. We started out and spotted a large herd of deer as we were just heading out of Killarney. A few miles later we spotted a buck chasing 3 does through a field.

Carrying on we spotted two moose to the west and then a little further and we saw a bull moose just off a mile road. He typically stands right in the middle of the section where we can see him but can’t. So we made quick detour to have a closer look.

Please ignore my awful iPhone photography, lol.

He wasn’t very photogetic but he did pass right in front of the vehicle so I was able to get a photo of him from closer up.

I don’t travel to work with my camera although I often comment that I should. I was just saying how nice it would be to get a photo of a moose on one of these small hills with the sun rising in the background and here, on this morning, we spotted more wildlife than we ever had. Anyways, we travelled down the mile road with the intention of just crossing back up to the highway. Instead we came upon a large drift and ended up turning around. When we got back to where we found the bull, we found his entire family. 5 of them off in the trees trying to get away from the crazy women chasing them.

On the way home we spotted all the moose again but not the deer.

So the next morning I came prepared. And guess what, not one animal that morning, not even a deer. That afternoon we took a detour home and spotted one deer.

So the following morning I tried again and, we spotted the family. Same location. Momma and her two yearlings, one boy, one girl. The girl is braver than her brother. There was no sun rise or hill for them to pose on but there was fog and frost and a good vantage point off their mile road.

The young bull took off and got himself situated into the willows until his Mom caught up to him.

All you can see are his legs and his little rack.

I do plan on heading back on a weekend where I can situate myself and wait them out. Hopefully I can get them on a clear day and I can catch the little bull moving around and away from his Mom. I’d also like to see the other two in this group because I think one is likely a large bull or maybe another cow with her yearling.

BUBBLE GUM SKY

Last night as I was trying to weasel into my bed with a book, Colton called me out to check out the sun. Glad he did. He figures he should get photo credits too!

Of course it dropped a lot faster than it usually seems to but that is only because I was struggling with finding the best setting for the shot.

PELICAN TOWN

I have driven by these vehicles hundreds of times. The kids at the colony have asked me to stop and take some photos. So finally I did.

Given that they are right out in the open and have some buildings beside them and behind them, I didn’t think I’d get any decent shots. Sometimes the best photos come from the opportunities you doubt most.

When I posted these photos on my Instagram account, Cade had no idea where I had found these as he is usually with me when I venture out now because I’m scared to go alone.

I am happy that the kids talked me in to it because I think they turned out pretty good.

When I texted them to one of the kids to see if they could identify them, they knew right away.

GREGORY

I’ve known about this house for many years.  I’ve shot it from the highway a couple of times.  This winter I asked a hockey Dad if he had info on it and he got me in touch with the owner.  I headed out there early this summer on a super hot, no cloud day!  It was a trek in and Cade came with me, for added security.  He also went to make sure I didn’t zap myself while dealing with the electric fence.

house 2 email

The current residents are of the beef variety but we didn’t see any actual cows, just patties.  You can get right up to the house but there isn’t really anything to see.

house 3 email

The house is on a bit of a tilt althought most of the time I figure its just me.  The one thing I miss on the Canon T6i is the level built into my screen.  My Powershot SX60 IS has it but I rarely use that camera anymore.  Like I said, it was REALLY hot out and I didn’t stay here for very long.  This is really a house that should be photographed on a day with stormy skies or a stunning sunrise or sunset.  For me, its just a tad to far from home for that.

house 1 email

There is no history on this home in any book I could get my hands on.  I am going to assume that the home was purchased many, many years ago for the purpose of farming and the house has not been lived in for a very long time.  The bay window on this old farm house is what always got my attention and I’m happy that I got to see it up close.

 

IN THE MIDDLE OF NOWHERE

Well, not really but this house would be right smack in the middle of a section of land and of course, I can’t confirm anything with the material that I have here.

woods 4 email

I have had permission to photograph this house for some time.  I went in the Fall and it was muddy.

woods 2 email

Iwoods 3 email

So Cade and the kids stopped with me on the way home from Brandon one day and Cade drove in part of the way and I hiked in the rest.  I didn’t go into the house but I did wander around as far as the snow would permit to get this tractor and a couple different angles of the house.

woods 5 email

While it was the house that got my attention and led me to this old homestead, once I was there it was this barn that I really liked.  Its held its own in our harsh Manitoba weather.

mouse for email

When we were driving out, Cade spotted this little rodent in our tire tracks so I got out of the car to chase him away so that we wouldn’t drive over him.  I truly think he was blind because I could literally reach out and grab him if I wanted to and I followed him down our tire tracks for some time.

HIDDEN BEAUTY

This beautiful home was built in the early 1900’s.

mansion from book

Mr. M. came to Manitoba in 1899 and married Bella in 1890.  Both were from Ontario. Together they had 4 children but sadly lost one girl at just 3 years of age.

side of house email

My photograph above was taken before I seen the photograph of the family and house from the Municipality history book.  A fellow abandoned seeker, Lee, who also photographed the house just days before me, took a shot at the same angle.  The house is a magnificent sight and I was determined not to miss a thing.

east side of house

I was told by the present land owner that when he purchased the home more than 20 years ago, the home was in excellent condition.  Over the years people have attended the home and stripped the brick of the front of the house, removed wood trim from the inside and broke the windows.

interior

If you note the door on the second floor, from the other side of the house I could see the staircase that leads up there.  All of the wood banisters have been removed as has most of the wood trim around the doors and windows.  The lack of glass in the windows has caused extensive damage to the inside of the home and there are now large holes in the floor.  The owner asked me not to go inside the house so I only peered through the windows.

feed barn email

There were many outbuildings on the property and a long stream flowed through the property.  The views from the home would have been spectacular at any time of the year.

walking up email

Mr. died in 1938 at the age of 77, 15 years after he lost his wife.  At that time, his youngest son, whom never married, took over the farm.  I am told that he lived in his own home across the road.  A friend asked his mother about the home and the family. She grew up in the small town near the home and she can remember them.  She remembers the son, a bachelor who wore a black top hat and smoked a pipe.

Years later when his sister lost her husband, he took her and her children in and eventually they moved back into this big, brick house.  When he retired in 1967 his nephew took over the family farm.

 

 

 

PENINSULA SCHOOL No.: 907

After a ratepayers meeting in 1901 and the assurance to two East Coast landowners that their land would only be used for a school, the sum of $700 was raised to build Peninsula School.  Miss Anges Moore, with a second class professional certificate was hired for the year for an annual salary of $420.  She resigned within one month.

peninsula school 1 email

The school was heated with coal and wood.  In 1927 the school was equipped with flat bowl coal oil lamps and then in 1950, oil burners were installed.  The school had a well stocked library with two sets of encylopedia, the World Book and Book of Knowledge, and wall maps.   The students were active in sports and 4H as well as community centered activities such as Christmas Concerts, picnics and dances.  It even hosted a funeral.

peninsula school 2 email

In 1934-35, it was reported that teachers at Peninsula School were paid $30 per month plus board.  The family boarding the teacher would receive a $15 per month credit to be applied to their taxes.

peninsula school 3 email

The school closed in 1960.

BELFRY SCHOOL No.: 627

The Belfry School District was established in January 1891 on land donated by local farmer, Warren Belfry from whom the school name was derived.

belfry school email

Five years later, the building was moved to its present location where it remains somehwat stable.  The floor is caving in so I did not attempt to enter beyond the front step.

belfry school 2 email

Due to low numbers, the school was closed between June 1940 and January 1945. The school closed permanently in June 1962 and the remaining students were bused to Elva SchoolPierson School, or Melita School.

belfry school 3 email

Some of the teachers who worked at Belfry School included: Miss Hope (1907), Miss Wheeler, Miss Rodgers, Miss Carson, Miss Fizzell, Miss Pheonix, Miss Archibald, Miss Strong, Miss Wells, Miss Shands, Olive House, Ruby Fletcher Reddaway (1939-1940), Miss Munro, Melba Dobbyn, Miss Cooper, Miss Stamper, Hazel McLintock, Mrs. Baker, Mrs. Roblin, and Mrs. Betty Pederson (1961-1962).